Grape varieties

Knowledge

Grape varieties

The wide range of grape varieties cultivated in Germany is impressive, from "A" as in Acolon, to "Z" as in Zweigeltrebe. Whilst almost 140 varieties are planted, around two dozen of these are of greatest commercial importance, above all, Riesling and Müller-Thurgau, also called Rivaner. These account for a good third of the 103,079 hectares of vineyards in 2019. In the case of red wine varieties, Pinot Noir and Dornfeld cultivation are of the greatest importance.

Germany now produces nearly 67% white wine and 33% red wine, in regions extending from the Elbe to Lake Constance. Some areas, such as the Moselle, Saar and Ruwer, are almost exclusively dedicated to white grape varieties. In contrast, regions in the south, such as Württemberg and Baden,and the Ahr in the north, have a longstanding red wine tradition. The trend towards red grape varieties has been unmistakable in all growing areas over the past few years and has now probably passed its peak. The most extensive red grape cultivation is in the two largest growing regions of Rheinhessen and Pfalz.

Another recent trend is the shift towards white and red Burgundy varieties and the renaissance of classic grape varieties.


Grape Varieties

Red Grapes

Around a third of the German vineyard area is planted with red grape varieties. Pinot Noir leads the red wine varieties, whilst classics such as Portugieser, Schwarzriesling, Lemberger or Saint Laurent, also play an important role. read more ...

Grape Varieties

White Grapes

In 2019, white wine varieties (68,911 hectares) accounted for exactly two thirds of the national vineyard area of ​​103,079 hectares. Riesling remains Germany's most important grape variety, with a quarter of the vineyard total planted with it. Other white grape varieties, such as Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris and Chardonnay, are playing an increasing role. read more