Bacchus

White Grapes

Bacchus

Bred in the Pfalz in the 1930s and named after the Latin term for Dionysos, "the Greek God of Wine", Bacchus is a crossing of (Silvaner x Riesling) x Müller-Thurgau.

Bacchus wines are often found in the Prädikatswein category with the appropriate residual sugar content. These wines are rich in extract and fruity with an independent bouquet which sometimes is similar to that of Scheurebe. Bacchus wines with a very high must weight and sufficient acidity can be similar to Riesling; they have a flowery aroma with a hint of Muscat. With its finely spicy aroma, Bacchus goes well with Asian dishes and fruity desserts such as fruit salad.

Bacchus is primarly cultivated in Rheinhessen and Franken. Initially it spread across all regions, reaching its peak in 1985, when 3.6% of all German vineyards were planted with the Bacchus grape, however today it is less common (1.6% in 2018).