Landmarks of Wine Culture

Tourism

Landmarks of wine culture

Region: Mosel

The Calmont Vineyard

There's no steeper slope even along the Mosel: With a gradient of up to 60%, the Calmont is the steepest sloped vineyard in all Europe. The hill with a height of 290 metres, rising between Bremm and Ediger-Eller, was born 400 million years ago in the earth age of Devon and consists of slate rocks and weathered graywacke stones.

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Region: Mosel

The City of Art Nouveau, Traben-Trarbach

This is a true landmark for the significance wine trading once held for the Mosel region: the Art Nouveau city of Traben-Trarbach. Around the year 1900, the small city in the middle of the Mosel valley was the most important wine trading city of the world – with the exception of French Bordeaux.

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Region: Mosel

Römische Kelteranlage Piesport

In these basins the Romans once trod upon Mosel finest fruits – quite literally: In Piesport, a small community on the Mosel, in 1985 the biggest Roman wine press north of the Alpes was discovered. It was discovered during the land clearance right at the feet of the famous steep slope site of the "Piesporter Goldtröpfchen."

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Region: Mosel

Vineyards' Sundials

They measure the progress of time throughout the day and they are as old as mankind: Up to the beginning of the 19th century, sundials were the yery synonym for watches – since there were no others. The principle is easy: A pole is fixed into earth paralleling the axis of the earth, its shadow then points out the position of the sun therefore denoting the hours or even minutes.

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Region: Mosel

Wine estate Vereinigte Hospitien, Trier

The heritage of Roman times, here you can grasp it with your hands: in the cellar of the Vereinigte Hospitien in Trier. The origins of the wine cellar reach back to the year 330 when two big storehouses stood on the banks of the river Mosel, called "horreas" by the Romans. Here, wine was stored which had been brought upstream, products from the wine presses further down the river.

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Region: Pfalz

Rhodt unter Rietburg

These grapevines are true veterans of viticultural history: More than 400 years old, the grapevines from the "Rhodter Rosengarten" have not only survived the centuries but still bear fruit every year. The vineyard in the wine community of Rhodt unter Rietberg is said to have existed already before the 30-Years-War – and that took place between 1618 and 1648.

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Region: Pfalz

Villa Weilberg with Wine Press

Underneath a red roof, a true treasure of viticulture is hidden in the middle of the vineyards on the edge of the city of Bad Dürkheim: a two thousand year old wine press from Roman times. The wine press with its building is the only one of that kind between Southern Palatinate and the Mosel.

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Region: Pfalz

The Roman Wine of Speyer

This is the oldest wine of the world – and it is still liquid at its core. The Historical Museum of Palatinate in Speyer guards one of the biggest treasures of viticulture there is in all of Germany: Wine that stems probably from around the year 325 after Christ, preserved in a greenly-yellow glass bottle of a cylindrical form adorned with two handles shaped like dolphins.

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Region: Pfalz

Wine city of Deidesheim

In this city, the first wine of high quality range was made within the region of Palatinate and this city shaped German wine politics to a large extent: there's hardly any other city in Germany which earns the label "Cradle of German Quality Wines" as much as Deidesheim.

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Region: Rheingau

Kloster Eberbach

This might well be the cradle of viticulture in the Rheingau, since no other building in the area symbolizes a centuries of culture of wine making as the Monastery of Eberbach near the village of Eltville does. It was in the year of the Lord 1136, when thirteen monks first set foot into this remote Rheingau valley.

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